• The main long-term goals of our theoretical research group are to understand and control large interacting quantum systems, as well as to design and create new ones.

  • AMO systems with long-range interactions, such as polar molecules and Rydberg atoms, are arguably the most controllable, tunable, and strongly interacting quantum systems.

  • Photons usually don't interact with each other. A grand long-term challenge that we try to solve in the quantum optics part of our research is to implement and study strongly interacting photons.

  • Topological phases, such as fractional quantum Hall states, are phases with no local order parameter and are instead characterized by more exotic quantities such as peculiar entanglement properties.

  • Atomic, molecular, and optical systems are often subject to dissipation and are often coherently driven by electromagnetic fields.

  • In this research area, we take advantage of the unique internal structure of ultracold alkaline-earth atoms (atoms in the second column of the periodic table) for quantum computing and clock applications, as well as for studying exotic many-body physics.