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Latest News and Research

A quantum sensor for nanoscale electron transport

The word “defect” doesn’t usually have a good connotation--often indicating failure. But for physicists, one common defect known as a nitrogen-vacancy center (NV center) has applications in both quantum information processing and ultra-sensitive magnetometry, the measurement of exceedingly faint magnetic fields. In an experiment, recently published in Science, JQI Fellow Vladimir Manucharyan and colleagues at Harvard University used NV centers in diamond to sense the properties of magnetic field noise tens of nanometers away from the silver samples.

Diamond, which is a vast array of carbon atoms, can contain a wide variety of defects. An NV center defect is formed when a nitrogen atom substitutes for a carbon atom and is adjacent...

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Sharper Nanoscopy
What happens when a quantum dot looks in a mirror?

The 2014 chemistry Nobel Prize recognized important microscopy research that enabled greatly improved spatial resolution. This innovation, resulting in nanometer resolution, was made possible by making the source (the emitter) of the illumination  quite small and by moving it quite close to the object being imaged.   One problem with this approach is that in such proximity, the emitter and object can interact with each other, blurring the resulting image.   Now, a new JQI study has shown how to sharpen nanoscale microscopy (nanoscopy) even more by better locating the exact position of the light source.

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Paul Julienne awarded William F. Meggers Award

The OSA announced JQI Fellow and NIST scientist Paul Julienne as the 2015 William F. Meggers Award recipient. The William F. Meggers Award recognizes outstanding work in spectroscopy. According to the citation, Julienne is being recognized for "seminal contributions to precision photoassociation and magnetic-Feshbach spectroscopy of ultracold atoms, and the application of these techniques to the formation of cold polar molecules." 

“OSA is greatly honored to recognize these leaders in the field of optics,” said Elizabeth Rogan, CEO, The Optical Society. “The recipients have demonstrated an expertise and leadership in their chosen field and have made significant contributions to the understanding of optics and photonics. OSA congratulates them on their outstanding achievements.” 

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Exploring Quantum Physics IV
Massive Open Online Course begins its fourth edition on March 30, 2015

“Exploring Quantum Physics" (EQP) a massive open online course (MOOC) on Coursera, begins its fourth edition on March 30, 2015. The link is: https://www.coursera.org/course/eqp. Taught by JQI Fellows Victor Galitski and Charles Clark, the course materials are linked to Galitski's 2013 Oxford University Press book, Exploring Quantum Mechanics . Some 84,000 students have enrolled in the first three editions of EQP, which were presented in 2013 and 2014.

EQP is designed to provide a proxy for learning quantum physics as it is taught at the University of Maryland at the advanced undergraduate/beginning graduate levels.

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Modular Entanglement Using Atomic Ion Qubits

JQI researchers, under the direction of Christopher Monroe have demonstrated modular entanglement between two atomic systems, separated by one meter. Here, photons are the long distance information carriers entangling multiple qubit modules. Inside of a single module, quantized collective vibrations called phonons connect individual qubits. In the latest result, one module contains two qubits and a second module houses a single qubit. This work was published in the journal Nature Physics, along with two related results that appeared in the Physical Review journals.

The two-by-one qubit entanglement is an experimental result that follows the theoretical design by Monroe and collaborators on building a modular universal quantum computer, published earlier in 2014.

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Novel Phases for Bose Gases

Strongly correlated electronic systems, like superconductors, display remarkable electronic and magnetic properties, and are of considerable research interest. These systems are fermionic, meaning they are composed of a class of particle called a fermion. Bosonic systems, composed another family of particles called bosons, offer a level of control often not possible in solid state systems. Creating analogous states in bose gases is an excellent way to model the dynamics of these less tractable systems. This means engineering a gas that, when cooled down to a condensate, assumes a phase equivalent to its solid state counterpart.

JQI theorists Juraj Radic, Stefan Natu, and Victor Galitski have proposed a new magnetic phase for a bose gas. The transition to this phase is analogous to the formation of ferromagnetism in magnetic materials, like iron, and might give insight into the physics of...

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JQI Fellows Manucharyan and Hafezi awarded prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship

Two JQI Fellows, Mohammad Hafezi and Vladimir Manucharyan, are among the four University of Maryland faculty members that have been awarded 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships. This award, granted by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, identifies 126 early-career scientists based on their potential to contribute fundamentally significant research to a wider academic community.

UMD’s 2015 Sloan Research Fellows are:

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Microfluidic Diamond Sensor
Moving bio particles magnetically

Measuring faint magnetic fields is a trillion-dollar business.  Gigabytes of data, stored and quickly retrieved from chips the size of a coin, are at the heart of consumer electronics.   Even higher data densities can be achieved by enhancing magnetic detection sensitivity---perhaps down to nano-tesla levels.

Greater magnetic sensitivity is also useful in many scientific areas, such as the identification of biomolecules such as DNA or viruses.  This research must often take place in a warm, wet environment, where clean conditions or low temperatures are not possible.  JQI scientists address this concern by developing a diamond sensor that operates in a fluid environment.

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Latest News and Research

  • A quantum sensor for nanoscale electron transport

    The word “defect” doesn’t usually have a good connotation--often indicating failure. But for physicists, one common defect known as a nitrogen-vacancy center (NV center) has applications in both quantum information processing and ultra-sensitive magnetometry, the measurement of exceedingly faint magnetic fields. In an experiment, recently published in Science, JQI... Continue Reading

  • Sharper Nanoscopy
    What happens when a quantum dot looks in a mirror?

    The 2014 chemistry Nobel Prize recognized important microscopy research that enabled greatly improved spatial resolution. This innovation, resulting in nanometer resolution, was made possible by making the source (the emitter) of the illumination  quite small and by moving it quite close to the object being imaged.   One problem with this approach is that in such proximity, the emitter and... Continue Reading

  • Paul Julienne awarded William F. Meggers Award

    The OSA announced JQI Fellow and NIST scientist Paul Julienne as the 2015 William F. Meggers Award recipient. The William F. Meggers Award recognizes outstanding work in spectroscopy. According to the citation, Julienne is being recognized for "seminal contributions to precision photoassociation and magnetic-Feshbach spectroscopy of... Continue Reading

  • Exploring Quantum Physics IV
    Massive Open Online Course begins its fourth edition on March 30, 2015

    “Exploring Quantum Physics" (EQP) a massive open online course (MOOC) on Coursera, begins its fourth edition on March 30, 2015. The link is: https://www.coursera.org/course/eqp. Taught by JQI Fellows Victor Galitski... Continue Reading

  • Modular Entanglement Using Atomic Ion Qubits

    JQI researchers, under the direction of Christopher Monroe have demonstrated modular entanglement between two atomic systems, separated by one meter. Here, photons are the long distance information carriers entangling multiple qubit modules. Inside of a single module, quantized collective vibrations called phonons connect individual qubits. In the latest result, one module contains two qubits... Continue Reading

  • Novel Phases for Bose Gases

    Strongly correlated electronic systems, like superconductors, display remarkable electronic and magnetic properties, and are of considerable research interest. These systems are fermionic, meaning they are composed of a class of particle called a fermion. Bosonic systems, composed another family of particles called bosons, offer a level of control often not possible in solid state systems.... Continue Reading

  • JQI Fellows Manucharyan and Hafezi awarded prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship

    Two JQI Fellows, Mohammad Hafezi and Vladimir Manucharyan, are among the four University of Maryland faculty members that have been awarded 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships. This award, granted by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, identifies 126 early-career scientists based on their potential to... Continue Reading

  • Microfluidic Diamond Sensor
    Moving bio particles magnetically

    Measuring faint magnetic fields is a trillion-dollar business.  Gigabytes of data, stored and quickly retrieved from chips the size of a coin, are at the heart of consumer electronics.   Even higher data densities can be achieved by enhancing magnetic detection sensitivity---perhaps down to nano-tesla levels.

    Greater magnetic sensitivity is also useful in many scientific areas, such as... Continue Reading

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