• With the recent advances in the construction of larger quantum information experiments, the variety of control parameters has begun to explode, leading to ever more challenging experimental setups and time spent preparing systems to have actual many body quantum states or controlled qubits. Fortunately, our physical understanding of the underlying systems is at an unprecedented level, enabling modeling of potential experiments on classical computers ever more accessible, and at least qualitatively similar.

  • Quantum information theory and experiments provide tools to help us learn about the most elementary questions we have about the natural world—how does gravity work? What kinds of particles are the fundamental building blocks of the universe? How does quantum mechanics apply to the very early universe, or in other extreme situations like black holes?

  • With increasing capabilities of quantum computing hardware, we are examining new classes of many-body systems that can be engineered and explored in the laboratory. One particular area of interest is low-disorder arrays of Josephson junction, probed using modern tools of circuit quantum electrodynamics. These arrays are host to a variety of novel effects and phenomena, often driven by their ability to host persistent-current vortices when penetrated by an external magnetic field. In a tunneling-dominated energy regime, these topological excitations are classically well-defined objects. However, due to the phase-number uncertainty relation, an energy regime exists where phase and charge number quantum fluctuations are on equal footing, introducing the concept of quantum vortices.

  • Complex quantum devices in the noisy, intermediate scale regime have unique challenges in testing: how do we understand their performance when we are unable to classically simulate their behavior, but their noise levels are too high for many fault-tolerance-focused metrology approaches to apply? Fortunately, we can take advantage of two different elements: first, the existence of exact solutions to larger quantum systems, which comes in direct analogy to the existence of integrable systems in classical dynamics. The second is the robustness of classical integrable models to small perturbations, leading to ‘islands of stability’ and regions of predictable behavior even with small amounts of noise.