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Items tagged with "ion trap"

August 16, 2019

Ions clear another hurdle toward scaled-up quantum computing

Scientists at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) have been steadily improving the performance of ion trap systems, a leading platform for future quantum computers. Now, a team of researchers led by JQI Fellows Norbert Linke and Christopher Monroe has performed a key experiment on five ion-based quantum bits, or qubits. They used laser pulses to simultaneously create quantum connections between different pairs of qubits—the first time these kinds of parallel operations have been executed in an ion trap.

March 6, 2019

Ion experiment aces quantum scrambling test

Researchers at the Joint Quantum Institute have implemented an experimental test for quantum scrambling, a chaotic shuffling of the information stored among a collection of quantum particles. Their experiments on a group of seven atomic ions, reported in the March 7 issue of Nature, demonstrate a new way to distinguish between scrambling—which maintains the amount of information in a quantum system but mixes it up—and true information loss.

August 8, 2018

JQI scientists Monroe and Gorshkov are part of a new, $15 million NSF quantum computing project

NSF has announced a $15 million award to a collaboration of seven institutions including the University of Maryland. The goal: Build the world’s first practical quantum computer.

November 29, 2017

Quantum simulators wield control over more than 50 qubits

Two independent teams of scientists, including one from the Joint Quantum Institute, have used more than 50 interacting atomic qubits to mimic magnetic quantum matter, blowing past the complexity of previous demonstrations. The results appear in this week’s issue of Nature.

July 12, 2017

Atomic cousins team up in early quantum networking node

Large-scale quantum computers, which are an active pursuit of many university labs and tech giants, remain years away. But that hasn’t stopped some scientists from thinking ahead, to a time when quantum computers might be linked together in a network or a single quantum computer might be split up across many interconnected nodes.

September 6, 2016

A sharper eye on ions

Optical systems, like your eye, sometimes need help to produce a crystal clear image. And it’s not just a problem for eyes. Research labs, too, worry about aberrations and distortions that lead to image inaccuracies. JQI physicists have implemented a novel imaging technique that adapts to these destructive errors and corrects them. They combine high performance lenses, akin to an artificial eye, with computer processing to capture an image of a single atomic ion and its motion with unprecedented nanoscale sensitivity. The research is featured on the cover of the September issue of Nature Photonics.

High-resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom J. D. Wong-Campos, K. G. Johnson, B. Neyenhuis, J. Mizrahi & C. Monroe, Nature Photonics doi:10.1038/nphoton.2016.136

June 6, 2016

Disorder grants a memory to quantum spins

Nature doesn’t have the best memory. If you fill a box with air and divide it in half with a barrier, it’s easy to tell molecules on the left from molecules on the right. But after removing the barrier and waiting a short while, the molecules get mixed together, and it becomes impossible to tell where a given molecule started. The air-in-a-box system loses any memory of its initial conditions.

January 6, 2016

Beating the heat

Harnessing quantum systems for information processing will require controlling large numbers of basic building blocks called qubits. The qubits must be isolated, and in most cases cooled such that, among other things, errors in qubit operations do not overwhelm the system, rendering it useless. Led by JQI Fellow Christopher Monroe, physicists have recently demonstrated important steps towards implementing a proposed type of gate, which does not rely on super-cooling their ion qubits.

January 6, 2016

$31M Grant Targets Quantum Computing’s Error Control Challenge

A team of researchers led by Duke University and the University of Maryland has been tapped by the nation’s “Q Branch” to take quantum computing efforts to the next level using one of the field’s leading technologies—ion traps.

July 27, 2015

Interacting Ion Qutrits

Symmetry permeates nature, from the radial symmetry of flowers to the left-right symmetry of the human body. As such, it provides a natural way of classifying objects by grouping those that share the same symmetry. This is particularly useful for describing transitions between phases of matter. For example, liquid and gas phases have translational symmetry, meaning the arrangement of molecules doesn’t change regardless of the direction from which they are observed.

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