RSS icon
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Vimeo icon
YouTube icon

Research News

Stars in the night sky
October 21, 2020 | Research News

A Billion Tiny Pendulums Could Detect the Universe’s Missing Mass

Researchers at JQI and their colleagues have proposed a novel method for finding dark matter, the cosmos’s mystery material that has eluded detection for decades. Dark matter makes up about 27% of the universe; ordinary matter, such as the stuff that builds stars and planets, accounts for just 5% of the cosmos. (A mysterious entity called dark energy, accounts for the other 68%.)

October 7, 2020 | Research News

Mind and Space Bending Physics on a Convenient Chip

Thanks to Einstein, we know that our three-dimensional space is warped and curved. And in curved space, normal ideas of geometry and straight lines break down, creating a chance to explore an unfamiliar landscape governed by new rules. But studying how physics plays out in a curved space is challenging: Just like in real estate, location is everything.

Slide announcing the launch of the NSF's second Convergence Accelerator cohort
September 29, 2020 | People News | Research News

UMD to Lead $1M NSF Project to Develop a Quantum Network

Quantum technology is expected to be a major technological driver in the 21st century, with significant societal impact in various sectors. A quantum network would revolutionize a broad range of industries, including computing, banking, medicine and data analytics. The internet has transformed virtually every aspect of our lives by enabling connectivity between people across the globe; a quantum internet could have a similar transformational potential for quantum technology. 

September 24, 2020 | Research News

Quantum Matchmaking: New NIST System Detects Ultra-Faint Communications Signals Using the Principles of Quantum Physics

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Department of Physics at the University of Maryland (UMD) and JQI have devised and demonstrated a system that could dramatically increase the performance of communications networks while enabling record-low error rates in detecting even the faintest of signals. The work could potentially decrease the total amount of energy required for state-of-the-art networks by a factor of 10 to 100. 

August 26, 2020 | Research News

New $115 Million Quantum Systems Accelerator to Pioneer Quantum Technologies for Discovery Science

The Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded $115 million over five years to the Quantum Systems Accelerator (QSA), a new research center led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) that will forge the technological solutions needed to harness quantum information science for discoveries that benefit the world. It will also energize the nation’s research community to ensure U.S. leadership in quantum R&D and accelerate the transfer of quantum technologies from the lab to the marketplace. Sandia National Laboratories is the lead partner of the center.

August 19, 2020 | PFC | Research News

Quantum Computers Do the (Instantaneous) Twist

Regardless of what makes up the innards of a quantum computer, its speedy calculations all boil down to sequences of simple instructions applied to qubits—the basic units of information inside a quantum computer.

Blue spheres representing atoms cause light, represented by red squiggly lines to scatter. A laser beam is represented in the background.
August 4, 2020 | Research News

Scientists See Train of Photons in a New Light

Flashlight beams don’t clash together like lightsabers because individual units of light—photons—generally don’t interact with each other. Two beams don’t even flicker when they cross paths.

A computer generated graphic showing intersecting blue beams holding pink cigar shaped tubes that represent atoms levitated in the optical cavity by laser beams.
July 30, 2020 | Research News

Quantum Simulation Stars Light in the Role of Sound

Inside a material, such as an insulator, semiconductor or superconductor, a complex drama unfolds that determines the physical properties. Physicists work to observe these scenes and recreate the script that the actors—electrons, atoms and other particles—play out. It is no surprise that electrons are most frequently the stars in the stories behind electrical properties. But there is an important supporting actor that usually doesn’t get a fair share of the limelight.

A colorful computer-generated map of the electrical current in a graphene channel that makes a sharp turn.
July 22, 2020 | Research News

Diamonds Shine a Light on Hidden Currents in Graphene

It sounds like pure sorcery: using diamonds to observe invisible power swirling and flowing through carefully crafted channels. But these diamonds are a reality. JQI Fellow Ronald Walsworth and Quantum Technology Center (QTC) Postdoctoral Associate Mark Ku, along with colleagues from several other institutions, including Professor Amir Yacoby and Postdoctoral Fellow Tony Zhou at Harvard, have developed a way to use diamonds to see the elusive details of electrical currents.

July 13, 2020 | PFC | Research News

New Quantum Information Speed Limits Depend on the Task at Hand

Unlike speed limits on the highway, most speed limits in physics cannot be disobeyed. For example, no matter how little you care about getting a ticket, you can never go faster than the speed of light. Similarly stringent limits exist for information, too. The speed of light is still the ultimate speed limit, but depending on how information is stored and transmitted, there can be slower limits in practice.

Red, purple and green light shine in the laboratory equipment used to create atomic gases for experiments.
April 27, 2020 | Research News

Quantum Gases Won’t Take the Heat

The quantum world blatantly defies intuitions that we’ve developed while living among relatively large things, like cars, pennies and dust motes. In the quantum world, tiny particles can maintain a special connection over any distance, pass through barriers and simultaneously travel down multiple paths.

A less widely known quantum behavior is dynamical localization, a phenomenon in which a quantum object stays at the same temperature despite a steady supply of energy—bucking the assumption that a cold object will always steal heat from a warmer object.

Pages