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Research News

Two hexagonal grids are twisted relative to each other to create hexagonal snowflake-like repeating patterns against a blue background.
October 18, 2021 | Research News

Graphene’s Magic Act Relies on a Small Twist

Carbon is not the shiniest element, nor the most reactive, nor the rarest. But it is one of the most versatile.

A chip made of golden bow-tie-shaped structure on top of a dark rectangular base that is used to contain ions for experiments and quantum computing tasks. The base of the chip has illegible markings on it.
October 4, 2021 | Research News

Foundational Step Shows Quantum Computers Can Be Better Than the Sum of Their Parts

Pobody’s nerfect—not even the indifferent, calculating bits that are the foundation of computers. But JQI Fellow Christopher Monroe’s group, together with colleagues from Duke University, have made progress toward ensuring we can trust the results of quantum computers even when they are built from pieces that sometimes fail. They have shown in an experiment, for the first time, that an assembly of quantum computing pieces can be better than the worst parts used to make it.

Rendering of a light-guiding lattice of micro-rings that researchers predict will create a highly efficient frequency comb
September 27, 2021 | Research News

Novel Design May Boost Efficiency of On-Chip Frequency Combs

On the cover of the Pink Floyd album Dark Side of the Moon, a prism splits a ray of light into all the colors of the rainbow. This multicolored medley, which owes its emergence to the fact that light travels as a wave, is almost always hiding in plain sight; a prism simply reveals that it was there. For instance, sunlight is a mixture of many different colors of light, each bobbing up and down with their own characteristic frequency. But taken together the colors merge into a uniform yellowish glow.

August 18, 2021 | Research News

Researchers Uncover a ‘Shortcut’ to Thermodynamic Calculations Using Quantum Computers

A collaboration between researchers at JQI and North Carolina State University has developed a new method that uses a quantum computer to measure the thermodynamic properties of a system. The team shared the new approach in a paper published August 18, 2021, in the journal Science Advances.

August 3, 2021 | Research News

New Approach to Information Transfer Reaches Quantum Speed Limit

Even though quantum computers are a young technology and aren’t yet ready for routine practical use, researchers have already been investigating the theoretical constraints that will bound quantum technologies. One of the things researchers have discovered is that there are limits to how quickly quantum information can race across any quantum device.

May 10, 2021 | Research News

JQI Researchers Generate Tunable Twin Particles of Light

Identical twins might seem “indistinguishable,” but in the quantum world the word takes on a new level of meaning. While identical twins share many traits, the universe treats two indistinguishable quantum particles as intrinsically interchangeable. This opens the door for indistinguishable particles to interact in unique ways—such as in quantum interference—that are needed for quantum computers.

A red beam with packets of photons represented as dots passes through a cloud of atoms represented by a cluster of blue spheres.
April 26, 2021 | Research News

Two (Photons) is Company, Three’s a Crowd

Photons—the quantum particles of light—normally don’t have any sense of personal space. A laser crams tons of photons into a tight beam, and they couldn’t care less that they are packed on top of each other. Two beams can even pass through each other without noticing.

Data in the form of a rainbow laid out around a central point next to a whorl of hair on a baby's head.
March 3, 2021 | Research News

Researchers Comb Atoms into a Novel Swirl

When you brush your hair in the morning, there’s a pretty good chance you’re not thinking about quantum physics. But the way your hair swirls as you brush is actually related to some features of the quantum world.

January 6, 2021 | Research News

A Frankenstein of Order and Chaos

Normally the word “chaos” evokes a lack of order: a hectic day, a teenager’s bedroom, tax season. And the physical understanding of chaos is not far off. It’s something that is extremely difficult to predict, like the weather. Chaos allows a small blip (the flutter of a butterfly wing) to grow into a big consequence (a typhoon halfway across the world), which explains why weather forecasts more than a few days into the future can be unreliable.

December 8, 2020 | Research News

Proposal Shows How Noisy Qubits Might Correct Themselves

One of the chief obstacles facing quantum computer designers—correcting the errors that creep into a processor’s calculations—could be overcome with a new approach proposed by physicists from JQI and the California Institute of Technology. The team, who are all affiliated with the National Institute of Standards and Technology, may have found a way to design quantum memory switches that will self-correct. 

December 7, 2020 | Research News

Enhanced Frequency Doubling Adds to Photonics Toolkit

The digital age has seen electronics, including computer chips, shrink in size at an amazing rate, with ever tinier chips powering devices like smartphones, laptops and even autonomous drones. In the wake of this progress, another miniature technology has been gaining steam: integrated photonics.

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