RSS icon
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Vimeo icon
YouTube icon

Research News

November 23, 2011 | Research News

Topological Matter in Optical Lattices

Atoms trapped by laser light have become excellent platforms for simulating solid state systems. These systems are also a playground for exploring quantum matter and even uncovering new phenomena not yet seen in nature.

 Credit: NIST/PML
November 14, 2011 | Research News

Adding Up Photons with a TES

Scientists have demonstrated that a superconducting detector called a transition edge sensor (TES) is capable of counting the number of as many as 1,000 photons in a single pulse of light with an accuracy limited mainly by the quantum noise of the laser source.

Photons and quantum dots, C. Suplee, NIST
October 25, 2011 | Research News

Quantum Computer Components 'Coalesce' to 'Converse'

If quantum computers are ever to be realized, they likely will be made of different types of parts that will need to share information with one another, just like the memory and logic circuits in today's computers do.

Borromean Rings
September 23, 2011 | Research News

Hints of Universal Behavior seen in Exotic 3-Atom States

A novel type of inter-particle binding predicted in 1970 and observed for the first time in 2006, is forming the basis for an intriguing kind of ultracold quantum chemistry. Chilled to nano-kelvin temperatures, cesium atoms---three at a time---come together to form a bound state hundreds or even thousands of times larger than individual atoms.

Image depicts photonic edge state in a 2D array of resonators. Transmission of light is protected from defects because the system exhibits a photonic version of the quantum spin Hall effect. (Image credit: E. Edwards)
August 22, 2011 | Research News

Miniaturizing Delay Lines

Information traveling near the speed of light always sounds a little like science fiction. But this is what we get whenever we connect to the internet or watch cable television. Small packets of light called photons travel kilometers over networks of optical fiber, bringing information into our homes.

Cartoon depicting anti-ferromagnetic order (upper) compared to a spin liquid phase (lower). In an anti-ferromagnet, the spins are anti-aligned. A spin liquid has no order and the spins can be viewed as bobbing about like water molecules in liquid water. (Image credit: E. Edwards)
August 12, 2011 | Research News

Searching for Spin Liquids

The world economy is becoming ever more reliant on high tech electronics such as computers featuring fingernail-sized microprocessors crammed with billions of transistors.

Understanding Quantum Magnetism
July 6, 2011 | Research News

Understanding Quantum Magnetism, Atom by Atom

Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) researchers led by Christopher Monroe, with theoreticians from University of Michigan, University of Auckland, and Georgetown University have observed a quantum ferromagnet using a nine ion crystal, in an atom-by-atom approach to quantum simulations of magnetism.

False color images of atom circuit, JQI/NIST
March 30, 2011 | Research News

The First Non-Trivial Atom Circuit

Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland (UM) have created the first nontrivial "atom circuit," a donut-shaped loop of ultracold gas atoms circulating in a current analogous to a ring of electrons in a superconducting wire.

The researchers create a synthetic electric field (E*) in an ultracold gas of several hundred thousand rubidium atoms (BEC) immersed in a constant magnetic field (B0). Using lasers (red arrows), the team alters the atoms’ energy-momentum relationship, which causes the atoms to move in a way that is physically identical—and mathematically equivalent—to how a charged particle would move in an electric field. credit: NIST
March 30, 2011 | Research News

Neutral Atoms Made to Act Like Electrically Charged Particles

Completing the story they started by creating synthetic magnetic fields, scientists from the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), a collaboration of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland, have now made atoms act as if they were charged particles accelerated by electric fields.

March 22, 2011 | Research News

Floquet Topological Insulators

Researchers at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) and the California Institute of Technology have shown that it may be possible to take a conventional semiconductor and endow it with topological properties without subjecting the material to extreme environmental conditions or fundamentally changing its solid state structure.

Pages

Subscribe to A Quantum Bit 

Quantum physics began with revolutionary discoveries in the early twentieth century and continues to be central in today’s physics research. Learn about quantum physics, bit by bit. From definitions to the latest research, this is your portal. Subscribe to receive regular emails from the quantum world. Previous Issues...

Sign Up Now

Sign up to receive A Quantum Bit in your email!

 Have an idea for A Quantum Bit? Submit your suggestions to jqi-comm@umd.edu