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JQI Podcast Episode 8

Waves Matter for Studying Matter

Depiction of electron scattering (credit S. Kelley)

Phil Schewe discusses how matter, such as atoms and electrons, can display wave-like properties. Steve Rolston describes early scattering experiments. Gretchen Campbell talks about matter waves in the context of modern Bose-Einstein condensate experiments.

 

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