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Ultracold SU(N) fermions: multicolor physics and orbital magnetism

June 15, 2015 - 1:30pm
Speaker: 
Guido Pagano
Institution: 
LENS - European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy / University of Florence

I will report on recent experiments performed at LENS with ultracold 173Yb Fermi gases. These two-electron  atoms are characterized by a large nuclear spin and highly-symmetric interactions, which result in the possibility of performing quantum simulations of multi-component fermionic systems with intrinsic and tunable SU(N) interaction symmetry. By controlling the number of spin components N, we have studied how static and dynamic properties of strongly-correlated 1D liquids of 173Yb fermions change with N, evidencing for the first time intriguing effects caused by the interplay between interactions, low-dimensionality and quantum statistics [1].

In addition to their nuclear spin, two-electron fermions offer experimental access to supplementary degrees of freedom, in particular to long-lived electronically-excited states. By coherent control of the atomic state on the ultranarrow 1S0 – 3P0 clock transition, we have recently obtained the first demonstration of fast, coherent spin-exchange oscillations between two fermionic 173Yb atoms in two different electronic orbitals [2], which paves the way to the observation of exotic quantum magnetism and of paradigmatic condensed-matter effects.

[1] G. Pagano et al., A one-dimensional liquid of fermions with tunable spin, Nature Physics 10, 198 (2014).

[2] G. Cappellini et al., Direct observation of coherent inter-orbital spin-exchange dynamics, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 120402 (2014).

2136 PSC
College Park, MD 20742

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