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Dynamically protected cat-qubits with quantum superconducting circuits

January 17, 2014 - 10:30am
Speaker: 
Mazyar Mirrahimi
Institution: 
(INRIA Paris-Rocquencourt and Yale University)

Abstract:
I will present a new hardware-efficient paradigm for encoding, protecting and manipulating quantum
information in a quantum harmonic oscillator, more specifically a cavity mode.
While an initial scheme [1] has allowed us to encode the quantum information on
a four-component Schrödinger cat state [2], a continuous monitoring of
photon-number parity observable [3] should lead to a protected quantum memory
[4]. After briefly presenting these results, I will elaborate on how through a
multi-photon driven dissipative process and quantum Zeno dynamics, one can
extend this scheme towards a new paradigm for universal quantum computation
with protected logical qubits [5].

[1] Leghtas et al., Deterministic protocol for mapping a qubit to coherent
state superpositions in a cavity, Phys. Rev. A, 87: 042315, 2013.

[2] Vlastakis et al., Deterministically encoding quantum information using
100-photon Schrödinger cat states, Science 342: 607-610, 2013.

[3] Sun et al., Tracking photon jumps with repeated quantum non-demolition
parity measurements, 2013, ArXiv:1311.2534.

[4] Leghtas et al., Hardware-efficient autonomous quantum memory protection,
Phys. Rev. Lett., 111, 120501, 2013.

[5] Mirrahimi et al., Dynamically protected cat-qubits: a new paradigm for
universal quantum computation, 2013, ArXiv:1312.2017.

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